Will storytelling give your presentation the engagement you’re looking for?

In our last blog, we discussed trying to engage an audience with the same charts and bullet points utilized by all the other presenters that day, and how that method actually does the opposite. It’s also why data-overloaded execs are increasingly asking for something different: stories

Execs hope that if people present with stories, they’ll finally see the context that makes the data meaningful. They’re hoping it will give them something to remember so they can use it to lead. And they hope it will make all those presentations they sit through a lot less boring.

The good news is that story can do all of that. But it can also do more—a lot more.

The science

Dr. Paul Zak heads the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies at Claremont Graduate University. Dr. Zak and his colleagues have conducted many experiments on the way our brains and bodies react to the delivery of information. Dr. Zak: “Effective stories change people’s behaviors. We’ve shown that in laboratories and field studies we can, through storytelling, induce people to engage…”

What about the power of story to unite a group? Princeton professor Dr. Uri Hasson studied the brains of five people listening to the same story. Before the experiment began, their brains showed different activity, but once they began to hear the story, their brain activity aligned. Story brought them together, not only figuratively, but also neurologically.

That’s amazingly powerful when you think about a multinational company. But on a smaller scale, it means that with story, you can unite everyone at the conference table around your insight and idea.

The timing for story couldnt be better

While execs are clamoring, people haven’t exactly been answering the call. In fact, the bar has never been lower. So if you strike now and bring your stakeholders a story, you’ll stand out and make a huge and meaningful difference.

But are all stories equal?

I’ve been in corporate America a long time and I’ve seen countless examples of storytelling. I’ve seen data visualization, improv, and dozens of “meet so-and-so” slides. Unfortunately, I’ve also seen many presenters get mired in the muck of it all. I’ve witnessed their confidence and credibility crumble in the room, and I really felt for them because they were giving it their best. They just didn’t have a method that fit the information, objectives, and situations unique to corporate environments.

So I decided to find a storytelling method that would work for corporate presentations. One that could give stakeholders what they’re clamoring for, and beyond. One that does what scientists say it will do: align audience brains to be more open to your ideas.

I wanted it to be a natural, easy-to-learn tool. Something that won’t weigh you down or crush your confidence, because when you and your team work as hard as you do, you deserve a method that will get your information heard, while making you look and feel like an expert.

And, as we’ll cover in our next blog, I found this method in a surprisingly obvious place that everyone already knows and loves…

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